Archive for the ‘Project Management’ Category

Agile has been around some 15 years now. Organisations have tried to leverage agile thinking. Some have failed. Yet agile thinking remains relevant to the enterprise. Agile thinking itself has evolved beyond a technical audience, and now encompasses the broader business community and leverages a smorgasbord of techniques. These include:

Kanban Extreme Programming (XP) Holacracy Scrum Rapid Application Development (RAD) Shu-Ha-Ri / Retrospectives Lean Startup Beyond Budgeting Motivation 3.0 Stoos Network Radical Management Management 3.0 Cynefin Framework WikiSpeed Social Contracts Agile Chartering Agile Testing NoEstimates Showcases

Agile effectively manages people, processes, resources, project time. It is important for teams to evolve soft skills like:

Communication Discipline Social Respect Responsibility

The tools for agile has also evolved. These provide:

Agile Metrics Impact Mapping, Story Mapping Feature, Epics, Stories Planning Poker Release Planning

 

Bimodal IT refers to having two modes of IT, each designed to develop and deliver information- and technology-intensive services in its own way. Mode 1 is traditional, emphasizing scalability, efficiency, safety and accuracy. Mode 2 is non-sequential, emphasising agility and speed.

After fads of Agile Management, PRINCE2, ITIL, P3M3, Waterfall etc… which all remain relevant to project execution, today’s enterprise recognises that different parts of the organisation operates under different parameters.

Agile remains the high suitable for smaller teams with high performance goals. The Agile Director is an expert in agile project management.

 

In data analytics, alot of decisions frequently need to be made. These can be data issues, business issues, technical issues, to people issues. In larger data projects, sizable data team performing multiple functions need to be managed. This is where delegation becomes important. Michael Hyatt discusses the 5 levels of delegation that a manager would encounter.

Level 1: Do exactly what I have asked you to do. Don’t deviate from my instructions. I have already researched the options and determined what I want you to do. Level 2: Research the topic and report back. We will discuss it, and then I will make the decision and tell you what I want you to do. Level 3: Research the topic, outline the options, and make a recommendation. Give me the pros and cons of each option, but tell me what you think we should do. If I agree with your decision, I will authorize you to move forward. Level 4: Make a decision and then tell me what you did. I trust you to do the research, make the best decision you can, and then keep me in the loop. I don’t want to be surprised by someone else. Level 5: Make whatever decision you think is best. No need to report back. I trust you completely. I know you will follow through. You have my full support.