Talend IPOs on Nasdaq above market expectations

Talend, a 10-year old software company that specialises in open-sourced data management tools with a subscription-based premium model, raised $86+ million in an initial public offering (IPO). The lead underwriters include Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Barclays, and Citigroup.

The company said it issued 5.25 million American Depositary Shares at a price of $18 per share, above the $15-$17 range it originally declared, thus raising $94.5 million.

In 2014, Talend CEO Mike Tuchen said that the company could go public “sometime in the next couple of years.” The company trades on NASDAQ under the symbol TLND.

Talend’s competitive edge lies in the value of its data integration products which cost a fraction of tools sold by Informatica, Tibco, and enterprise software vendors like IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP. Talend customers include AOL, Citi, GE Healthcare, Groupon, Lenovo, Orange, Sky, and Sony.

Last year, Talend generated a total revenue of $76 million. Its subscription revenue grew 39% year over year, representing $62.7 million of the total. The company isn’t profitable: it reported a net loss of $22 million for 2015. In the first quarter of this year, Talend produced a $5.2 million loss on $22.7 million in revenue, up 33.5 percent year over year. For that quarter, 84 percent of the revenue derived from subscriptions; the rest resulted from professional services.

Talend started in 2005 and is headquartered in Redwood City, California. The company had 566 employees as of March 31. Investors include Bpifrance, Iris Capital, Silver Lake Sumeru, Balderton Capital, and Idinvest Partners.

The company offers cloud and on-premises versions of its software, which supports the Hadoop open-source big data software and is based on the open-source Apache Camel.

Kimonolabs merges into Palantir

Congratulations to Pratap Ranade and Ryan Rowe as the web-scaping-as-a-service company which they co-founded (called Kimonolabs) has been acquired by Palantir.

Kimonolabs started as a Winter 2014 Y Combinator class startup. It recently raised USD5M in 2014, but this hasn’t help delaying their choice to shutter their doors for jobs at Palantir.  Pratap explained that the startup has not been able to have the impact it wanted within the two years from launch. So Kimonolabs falls too the wayside where many other web-scaping tools have gone leaving their 125K users in the lurch.

They have given 2 weeks notice to their users to migrate data and services from the platform. The last day is 29 Feb 2016. The absolute last day for API services is 31st March 2016. Your data will be purged and Palantir will not have access to it. If you depend on this service, you will probably be scrambling at this point for alternatives. I am sure that when you assess the risk for utilising a technology like Kimonolabs, you will consider the financial and resource stability of the company.

Here is a list of alternative web scraping tools and technologies. We also recommend utilising established SaaS ETL services as viable alternatives.

 

Capsicum & Jalapeno

Meet CAPSICUM Business Architects, a company founded by CEO Terry Roach (Australia) and focused on understanding your business. The approach is to turn it into a digital model using semantics and a custom-built business modelling platform “Jalapeno” thus enabling, facilitating and quantifying change.

This is indeed revolutionary, and CAPSICUM leads where many have failed to map the evolving enterprise.

The Jalapeno tool is a semantic modelling tool leveraging tuples and RDF to describe an enterprise, and it stores this information in a database. It models the organisation from a top-down perspective, maybe a business-centric perspective, or from existing standards. Of course this tool is really as good as its modellers.

Why do I say this is revolutionary? The reason for this, is that the bulk of enterprise architects continually struggle to map the existing enterprise working from the ground up, and often are unable to plan the future state effectively.

Maybe the approach to enterprise architecture has been reactive for most of the time, and largely unable to meet the speed of changing business scenarios. Maybe Business Architecture has a better chance, but maybe Jalapeno has the design to be truely revolutionary.

It’s probably best to map an organisation at the strategic business level, where benefits of change are being considered, and mapping that through the organisation measuring CAPEX, OPEX, actors, structure and cost of change. Gap architecture really.

This all sounds very familiar as an idealistic state of well governed enterprise architecture or business architecture practices, and I’ll definitely be happy to see the Jalapeno platform make further progress.

 

Periscope Data

Periscope Data is a cloud-based business intelligence analytics and distribution platform. Periscope Data has taken the pain out of data loading by directly connecting to your data sources with no messy ETLs.

Periscope visualizes your data into charts, graphs and dashboards. All you need to do is to write SQL queries in Periscope and it returns charts and reports and dashboards that you can share or embed.

Periscope is licensed by the number of data rows you share with Periscope. You can have unlimited users. Your Periscope package includes Unlimited Charts, Unlimited Users, Dashboards, Unlimited Embedding and white-labeling, and Unlimited Support.

Pricing of packages start at $1,000 a month for up to 1 Billion rows of data and scale linearly from there. There is no annual commitment, you can pay month to month.

You can take advantage the Periscope caching tool at no additional cost. Caching reduces load on your database, results in faster performance and gives you the ability to upload csv’s and do cross database joins. Your query speeds will run 150x times faster with Periscope caching.

  • https://www.periscopedata.com/
  • http://wiki.glitchdata.com/index.php?title=Periscope_Data

GoodData

logo-gooddata-big1GoodData is a company that has been on the data scene since 2007. Founded by Roman Stanek the former CEO of NetBeans, and Systinet, GoodData seems to be in good hands. Roman Stanek sold NetBeans previous to Sun Microsystems in 1999, and Systinet to HP 2006.

GoodData has raised USD53.5M in venture funding from the likes of Andreessen Horowitz, Tim O’Reilly, AlphaTech Ventures, General Catalyst Partners, Windcrest Partners, Intel Capital and TOTVS. It employs 291 staff across 5 offices in Prague, Brno, San Francisco, Portland, and Boston.

GoodData has a joint venture with Chris Gartlan to grow an APAC presence. Based in Melbourne-Australia, GoodData APAC has a team of 10 staff focused on growing the business.

So what is the GoodData value-proposition? It’s simply a fully managed cloud-based business intelligence platform. GoodData does it end-to-end taking on the capital costs of building data-warehouses and data-marts and providing speed and agility in delivering results.

These results are actionable insights which under traditional data integration would cost anywhere from 7x to 15x. So whether you run lean OPEX or CAPEX, this solution can be tailored to your requirements.

Agility comes in the form of a managed solution. Business Units can now independently build datamarts, and visualise data. This is where cloud-based BI performs.

So what are GoodData’s strengths with such a broad focus across a very big data chain? Customer-focus seems to be the key. Even with a fully out-of-the box solution, GoodData is agile enough to custom-fit various parts of the datachain. This could be data integration, data storage systems, to visualisation components.

 

Outsourced cloud-based BI is the new spin on the disk.