Posts Tagged ‘Data’

#10 — Panera

Number of victims: 37 millionWho was targeted: All PaneraBread.com customer accountsWhat data was exposed: Names, email and physical addresses, birthdays, and the last four digits of the customers’ credit card numbersTimeframe: Disclosed April 2018What happened: Despite being warned by a cybersecurity expert in August 2017 that their website was leaking data, the Panera IT team failed to act until 8 months later when it announced the leak and took the site down for security maintenance.

#9 — Newegg

Number of victims: 50 millionWho was targeted: Newegg online shoppersWhat data was exposed: Credit card infoTimeframe: August 14, 2018 – September 18, 2018What happened: The online retailer was hacked by cybergang Magecart, who injected a credit card skimming code into the Newegg website. Whenever a customer bought something online, that payment info went straight to Magecart’s C&C (command and control server).

#8 — Elasticsearch

Number of victims: 82 million (57M consumers, 26M businesses)Who was targeted: Users and online businesses across the internetWhat data was exposed: From individual users — names, email and physical addresses, phone numbers, IP addresses, employers, and job titles. From businesses — names, company details, zip codes, carrier routes, latitudes/longitudes, census tracts, phone numbers, web addresses, email addresses, employee count, revenue numbers, NAICS codes, SIC codes, and more.Timeframe: Discovered November 14, 2018What happened: This is one of those cases we mentioned above where a regular security audit led to a researcher stumbling upon over 80 million records of sensitive, aggregated data. It is unknown how long the databases were sitting unguarded and who, if anyone, has had the opportunity to copy and steal all the data. Cybersecurity experts believe they have tracked down the source of the unguarded databases to a data management company that has since closed its doors, but it is still officially unknown.

#7 —  Facebook

Number of victims: 87 millionWho was targeted: Facebook usersWhat data was exposed: Profile info, political beliefs, friend networks, private messagesTimeframe: Disclosed September 2018What happened: This is the notorious Cambridge Analytica scandal where the data-collecting firm illegally harvested users’ info without their permission. The secret operation was politically motivated—namely, to influence the 2016 US presidential campaign. And though the breach occurred a couple years ago, it’s only this year that investigatory conclusions have come out, giving us a clearer picture of what happened.

#6 — MyHeritage

Number of victims: 92 millionWho was targeted: MyHeritage usersWhat data was exposed: email addresses and hashed passwordsTimeframe: Alerted June 2018What happened: Cybersecurity researchers alerted the genealogy site in June 2018 that an outside server had been discovered with sensitive MyHeritage info. The company confirmed the info was legitimate and alerted its users that any account holders who signed up earlier than October 26, 2017 were at risk and should change their passwords.

#5 — Quora

Number of victims: 100 millionWho was targeted: Quora usersWhat data was exposed: Names, email addresses, hashed passwords, profile data, public and non-public actionsTimeframe: Discovered December 3, 2018What happened: Many questions still surround the details of this breach, but the question-and-answer site reported to its users that a third party had gained unauthorized access to one of their systems, expounding no further.  

#4 — Under Armour

Number of victims: 150 millionWho was targeted: MyFitnessPal usersWhat data was exposed: User names, email addresses, hashed passwordsTimeframe: Late February 2018What happened: The company’s food and nutrition app was hacked, opening up the above info to the attackers, but not, thankfully, any payment info, which the company processes through a separate channel.

#3 — Exactis

Number of victims: 340 million (230M consumers, 110M businesses)Who was targeted: Users and businesses across the internetWhat data was exposed: Over 400 categories of detail, such as phone numbers, email and physical addresses, interests, ages, religions, pet ownership, etc.Timeframe: June 2018What happened: Data collection firm Exactis somehow had 2 terabytes of data relocated to a public site for all to see. It’s unknown who or how many people accessed the info before it was discovered.

#2 — Starwood

Number of victims: 500 millionWho was targeted: Starwood guestsWhat data was exposed: Names, email and physical addresses, phone numbers, passport numbers, account info, birth dates, gender, travel info, and accommodation info. Some of the breached info also included hashed credit card info.Timeframe: Discovered September 10, 2018, but could have stretched as far back as 2014What happened: Like many of the other official breach statements, the Marriott-owned hotel chain issued a statement that its servers had suffered “unauthorized access,” but recent discoveries from the investigation indicate the breach may have been caused by the Chinese government for political purposes.

#1 — Aadhaar

Number of victims: 1.1 billionWho was targeted: Indian citizensWhat data was exposed: Aadhaar numbers, names, email and physical addresses, phone numbers, and photosTimeframe: August 2017 – January 2018What happened: Anonymous sellers over WhatsApp charged Rs 500 and lower for a portal into India’s Unique Identification Authority where the records of virtually every citizen was at the payer’s fingertips.

The Agile Director <a href=”http://theagiledirector.com/content/4-things-twitter-can-give-business-intelligence” target=”_blank”>recently commented</a> on using Social Media feeds as a form of data to give organisations insight through Business Intelligence initiatives formed on social media. This is very true. If companies realise that their businesses are built on their customers,  all their internal systems should align accordingly. This is applicable to retail, property, media,  communications, telcos, etc.., and the end-results are forward thinking, pro-active, customer-centric organisations. <div>

The Data Chasm represents the gap between those who realise this paradigm. It’s as fundamental as the <a href=”http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/homesteading/” target=”_blank”>manifesto </a>of “<a href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cathedral_and_the_Bazaar” target=”_blank”>The Cathedral and the Bazaar</a>”.

Data – A large portion of the corporate future will be driven by those who have it, and those who don’t. Then its driven by those who know what to do with it, and those who don’t.

The gap between the haves and have nots is growing, where even governments, and corporations fall under the have nots.

Open data is the way forward to close the chasm. Supplying data alone  is only the first step. As in economics, banking, media, supply chain,  logistics, there are eco-systems of data analysts that churn out  information. But yes, the common denominator across all these diverse  industries is digital media. That is the key to bridge the data chasm.

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Have you seen a bag full of mustard seeds. Small, little, round seeds that if you accidentally dropped a handful, the seeds scatter on the floor, and roll into hidden, tiny places. More concerning than this, is the ability of a single mustard seed to grow much larger. A bit like Katamari.

Moving data is a bit like moving people. In most organisation, people are frequently involved in the generation, the transformation, the curation, the classification, and analysis of data. And if any of these facets of data management fail, there will be trouble.

The most reliable aspect of such Herculean efforts is the truck, or platform. That is why many organisation prefer to depend on a platform instead of the myriad of parts to make a data project work.

However, most platforms do look like this truck. Rigid, low on flexibilty, and probably not customised for your organisations needs.